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How the “love story” between Monty and Rose unfolded on Montrose Beach – Chicago Tribune

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Meet Monty and Rose, a Chicago-based pair of buzzards.

The endangered coastal bird pair chose Montrose Beach as a summer nesting site three years ago, breaking records by flying chicks and serving as a symbol of a city that has hopes and is as heavy as two birds, individually weighing less than a stick. oil. city ​​beach to save your view.

“It’s a story of return because they had a much smaller population and then they came back. It’s a wonderful story of conservation, “said Patricia O’Donnell, a monkey monitor. “But I have to tell you it’s a love story.”

This is how this story unfolded along the shores of Lake Michigan.

The fate of two endangered buzzards, which have decided to nest on Montrose Beach, is in question, as it is planned to establish a music festival in the same place. “Even in the best of conditions, the life of a small ferret chick is very dangerous.”

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The chicks celebrate the great victory of a pair of Monty and Rose buzzards, as well as conservation efforts in Chicago. This is the first time one of the birds has hatched in Cook County in more than 60 years. Meanwhile, the music festival plans to move its scenes away from the nesting area.

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After 33 years, only 73 couples on the endangered list are glacial progress, and the goal of complete recovery is modest – only 150 couples. This is for all the Great Lakes.

So these are allies, they sweat every bird.

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After arriving in Chicago in the summer – where they survived a flooded house and fireworks on July 4, dodged volleyball players and hungry dogs, chased away a great blue heron, overturned a music festival and even faced the death of one of them – zuki left the beach.

Now poultry farmers feel empty nests.

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Specialists are preparing and adjusting to the icy summer during the pandemic. Everyone from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Chicago County Park to Lincoln Park Zoo and local enthusiasts are waiting for the return of the two birds.

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Monty and Rose appeared in early May on North Side Beach, raising hopes for more buzzard chicks as they engaged in, as poultry farmers say, “courtship”.

By Sunday morning there were three eggs in the ferret’s nest. A fourth is likely to complete the clutch, expected soon.

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Surviving chicks, often referred to by poultry breeders as “pouf-balls”, need to dodge predators for several weeks and eat as much as possible before they fly away and commit a second act of Monty and Rose’s efforts to conserve the species.

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Monty and Rose nested earlier this season in a more secluded spot that withstood the most rocky storms of the season. By the end of July, their three chicks were hanging out in Montrose unattended. They lost their down, and like their parents when they first met, there were still no feather collars.

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After two seasons of summer vacation in northern Chicago, Monty and Rose can return to a modernized summer home.

Chicago County Park has signed a subscription to expand the habitat of the natural area of ​​the Montrose Dunes, part of the beach where a pair of endangered bugs escaped from the Big Lake music festival, lost their eggs, fought off other birds and successfully flew out of the chicks. two summers in a row.

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The beautiful Chicago Zuccas are back together, settling into their third summer to save their view of Montrose Beach along the Michigan Lake coast.

Monty and Rose, endangered beetles from the Great Lakes that became the first pair to successfully nest in Chicago in decades, together traveled more than 2,000 miles to return to Chicago in just one day.

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Like a father, like a chick.

The Great Lakes, which have had a number of successes since becoming the first endangered shore birds to nest in Chicago in decades, may add another feather to their hats – one of last year’s descendants migrated and nests in Ohio.

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Neither the threat of a music festival, nor the fireworks of the Fourth of July, nor rogue dogs and volleyball games, nor the high level of the lake and torrential storms – not even skunks – could hinder the breeding of buzzards in the Great Lakes of Chicago.

The third round of Monty and Rose chicks began to hatch on Montrose Beach, a coveted spectacle for fans of endangered coastal birds after their three sustained years of nesting in the North Side sands – and after the first laying of eggs was revived.

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The last of four endangered eggs of two buzzards hatched at Lincoln Park Zoo on Friday, becoming the first pair to successfully nest in Chicago in decades. The egg was brought to the zoo after the first three eggs hatched under the care of the bird’s parents.

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Two surviving chicks from the endangered Monty and Rose buzzards of the Great Lakes may soon fly south. But some of the birds that have been watching them this summer have gathered on Montrose Beach to wish them good luck with their own names before they disappear.

Imani and Sevka will be the last buzzards to be found in the Montrose family, a group of bird conservation and conservation groups announced Friday night in front of the besieged dunes where Monty and Rose nested for the third summer.

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Even before the leaves lose their green, the nights are cool and the days are shortened, there is a clear sign that the next summer is coming to an end: zuki have left the beach.

Monty and Rose, wolves from the Great Lakes, who three years ago became the first of the endangered coastal birds to successfully nest in Chicago in decades, flew south after another summer to Montrose Beach.

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Information about their long-awaited return began to spread.

He was not noticed at his home in Texas, and the wind was right for travel. It is known that she flew at about the same time from her island of Florida, sometimes arriving earlier than him. Wishes for safe flights came from all over the country when Chicagoans wishing to see early planned to head to the beach.

By April 24, Monty, a buzzard from the Great Lakes, had returned to Chicago.

Now poultry farmers are waiting for the Rose.

>>> Read the full story here

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