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How to make travel plans for the summer of 2022 that are really happening Health

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After two years of cancellations, delays and marathon sessions with airline customer service, many travelers are hoping to book summer trips that will actually end this year.

“In May 2020, I didn’t work at all,” said Catherine Ng, an engineering program manager in Los Angeles. Ng planned to visit Europe and Morocco, but had to cancel and rebook for the next, 2021. These new plans were eventually discontinued because it had not yet been fully vaccinated by May, and travel restrictions prevented it.

“Fortunately, canceling the trip was easy because of the COVID cancellation policy,” Ng says. However, while getting a refund, it was nice, it didn’t cause itching from having to take a real vacation.

Many travelers, twice affected by thwarted plans for the summer, are embarrassed to make them again this year. Even experts have given up trying to predict what turns the pandemic will take next. But no matter what happens, travelers can maximize their chances of summer travel success with a few simple steps.

Traveling is not easy returning. Rave back.

“We are already in 2019 airline ticket prices,” said Audit Damadaran, an economist at Hopper, a travel booking app that tracks airfare price trends. “We have already exceeded our initial price forecast.”

Prices are rising in part due to rising consumer demand, but volatile oil prices may play an even bigger role. When the conflict in Ukraine forced some travelers to cancel trips to Europe, prices did not follow.

“In Europe, demand is declining, but prices have not fallen,” says Damadaran. “In fact, they have increased. Airlines can preventively adjust tariffs to take into account changes in fuel prices.

Whatever the reason, airfare is unlikely to drop significantly until the peak of summer travel. So booking sooner rather than later can help you avoid getting a price this season of travel.

The pandemic has led to one consumer-friendly change: most airlines and hotels now offer more flexible booking options. And if we have been taught anything for the last two years, it is because no trip, no matter how good it is planned, is safe from disruption.

The best way to find flexible booking options depends on many factors, but there are a few simple rules.

– Avoid cost-effective airfare, as they do not allow you to change or cancel.

– Choose hotel rooms with free cancellation. Sometimes these tariffs are slightly higher than their non-returnable counterparts.

– Carefully read the rental policy. Services like Airbnb and Vrbo usually allow hosts to choose a cancellation policy.

Hopper’s data shows that the number of economy bookings made on its platforms declined significantly in 2021 after airlines introduced more flexible options for other fares. Now these low rates are only 20% of the total bookings compared to almost 40% before the industry change.

CHOOSING DIRECTIONS WISE

Even if COVID-19 cases decrease during spring and summer, it may be some time before all international travel restrictions follow.

“I was planning a trip to South Korea, but could not cope with the seven-day quarantine in hotels,” – says Ng, referring to the strict rules of the country. Ng decided to visit Europe this summer, where such restrictions do not currently apply. She feels more confident that the rules associated with COVID will not suddenly change just before or, worse, during her trip.

When choosing a destination, start with countries that have restrictions that meet your risk tolerance, and go back.

Of course, these restrictions can be avoided by sticking to domestic travel, but many travelers seek to travel abroad.

MAKE A RESERVE PLAN – OR SEVERAL

Even with all these precautions, anything can happen. Another outbreak, option or military conflict could break even the best plans, so it’s important to make a backup.

First, after planning your main trip, think about making multiple bookings with a fully refundable price for a second, separate trip. This can be a hedge to ensure you don’t have to book everything last minute at the peak of the season. Just don’t book your tickets if they really don’t return – most of the basic fares in the cabin are refunded in the form of vouchers from the same airline that aren’t as good as the available ones.

Second, sketch out the idea of ​​a third trip with the intention of booking it at the last minute when the original plans fail. This step can help psychologically avoid losing strength when changing plans.

Finally, think of a few short trips over the summer instead of one long trip to one destination. This approach not only protects against potential blockages for specific locations, but can also help compensate for lost visits during a pandemic.

This article was provided by The Associated Press on the NerdWallet personal finance website. Sam Kemis is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: skemmis@nerdwallet.com.

NerdWallet: Travel came back when you missed it https://bit.ly/nerdwallet-travel-is-back-in-case-you-missed-it

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